KaliIntelligenceSuite - Shall Aid In The Fast, Autonomous, Central, And Comprehensive Collection Of Intelligence By Executing Standard Penetration Testing Tools

KaliIntelligenceSuite – Shall Aid In The Fast, Autonomous, Central, And Comprehensive Collection Of Intelligence By Executing Standard Penetration Testing Tools

 

Kali Intelligence Suite (KIS) shall aid in the fast, autonomous, central, and comprehensive collection of intelligence by automatically:

  • executing Kali Linux tools (e.g., dnsrecon, gobuster, hydra, nmap, etc.)
  • querying publicly available APIs (e.g., Censys.io, Haveibeenpwned.com, Hunter.io, Securitytrails.com, DNSdumpster.com, Shodan.io, etc.)
  • storing the collected data in a central rational database (see next section)
  • providing an interface to query and analyze the gathered intelligence

After the execution of each Kali Linux tool or querying APIs, KIS analyses the collected information and extracts as well as reports interesting information like newly identified user credentials, hosts/domains, TCP/UDP services, HTTP directories, etc. The extracted information is then internally stored in different PostgreSql database tables, which enables the continuous, structured enhancement and re-use of the collected intelligence by subsequently executed Kali Linux tools.

Additional features are:

  • pre-defined dependencies between Kali Linux tools ensure that relevant information like SNMP default community strings or default credentials is known to KIS before trying to access the respective services

  • remembering the execution status of each Kali Linux tool and API query ensures that already executed OS commands are not automatically executed again

  • data imports of scan results of external scanners like Masscan, Nessus, or Nmap

  • supporting the intelligence collection based on virtual hosts (vhost)

  • using a modular approach that allows the fast integration of new Kali Linux tools

  • parallel Kali Linux command execution by using a specifiable number of threads

  • enables users to kill Kali commands via the KIS user interface in case they take too long

  • access public APIs to enhance data with OSINT

Setup and Installation

Refer to INSTALL for more information.

KIS’ Data and Collection Model

The following figure illustrates KIS’ data and collection model. Thereby, each node represents a table in the rational database and each solid line between the nodes documents the corresponding relationship. The dashed directed graphs document based on which already collected intelligence (source node) KIS is able to collect further information (destination node). The labels of the directed graphs document the techniques used by KIS to perform the collection.

Scoping the Engagement

Scoping is an essential feature of KIS, which specifies on which IP networks, IP addresses, host names, etc.,
KIS is allowed to collect data (e.g., via OSINT or active scans) from. Before diving into scoping, it is important to understand the following collection types, which are supported by KIS:

  • Passive: Passive collections do not directly interact with the targets but obtain the information from third-party sources like whois. Per default, KIS automatically executes these collections and, thereby, no scoping is required.
  • Active: Active collections directly interact with the targets by for example actively scanning them. Thus, in contrast to passive collections, these type of collection requires permission from the target’s owner and, therefore, KIS does not automatically perform active collections unless the targets are explicitly marked as in scope.
  • Active*: Active* collections are actually passive collections. Nevertheless, as accessing some third-party sources is somehow limited (e.g., querying certain sources like Shodan.io cost credits), they are treated like active collectors, and, as a result, targets must be marked as in scope in order to perform active* collections on them.

Scopes can be set on the following items by using the script kismanage:

  • IP networks and IP addresses: For IP networks the following scope types can be set:

    • all: Sets the given IP network (e.g., 192.168.1.0/24) together with all IP addresses (e.g., 192.168.1.1) that are within this network range in scope. As a result, KIS automatically executes any active and active* collectors on such IP networks and IP addresses.

      This scope type is useful during penetration tests where the scope is limited to certain IP networks and all their IP addresses.

      The following listing provides an example on how this scope type is set during the initial intel collection setup:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the network 192.168.1.0/24 to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage network -w example -a 192.168.1.0/24
      # add new IP address 192.168.1.1 to workspace example. IP address is automatically in scope due to the network's scope all
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage host -w example -a 192.168.1.1
      # verify the initial setup
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kisreport host -w example --csv | csvcut -c "Network (NW)","Scope (NW)","IP Address (IP)","In Scope (IP)" | csvlook
      | Network (NW) | Scope (NW) | IP Address (IP) | "In Scope (IP)" |
      | -------------- | ------------- | --------------- | --------------- |
      | 192.168.1.0/24 | all | 192.168.1.1 | True |
    • strict: Sets the given IP networks’ (e.g., 192.168.1.0/24) scope to strict. In contrast to type all, the network itself is not in scope and IP addresses within this network range (e.g., 192.168.1.1) are not automatically in scope, unless they are explicitly added. As a result, KIS only automatically executes any active or active* collectors on IP addresses that are explicitly added to the scope.

      This scope type is useful during penetration tests where the scope is limited to certain IP addresses within a given network.

      The following listing provides an example on how this scope type is set during the initial intel collection setup:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the network 192.168.1.0/24 to workspace example and set the scope to strict
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage network -w example -a 192.168.1.0/24 -s strict
      # add new IP address 192.168.1.1 to workspace example and set it in scope (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage host -w example -a 192.168.1.1
      # verify the initial setup
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kisreport host -w example --csv | csvcut -c "Network (NW)","Scope (NW)","IP Address (IP)","In Scope (IP)" | csvlook
      | Network (NW) | Scope (NW) | IP Address (IP) | "In Scope (IP)" |
      | -------------- | ------------- | --------------- | --------------- |
      | 192.168.1.0/24 | strict | 192.168.1.1 | True |
    • exclude: Sets the given IP network (e.g., 192.168.1.0/24) together with all IP addresses (e.g., 192.168.1.1) that are within this network range out of scope. As a result, KIS does not execute any active and active* collectors on this IP network and its IP addresses.

      This scope type is the default type for all IP networks and IP addresses that are automatically identified by KIS (e.g., via whois, DNS resolution, etc.). Nevertheless, this scope type can be used to manually exclude networks from scope at a later time.

  • Second-level domain and host names: For second-level domains (e.g., megacorpone.com), the same scope types as for IP networks (see above) exist. Their mode of operation is described below:

    • all: Sets the given second-level domain (e.g., megacorpone.com) together with all sub-domains (e.g. www.megacorpone.com) in scope. As a result, KIS automatically executes any active and active* collectors on such host names.

      This type is useful during penetration tests where the scope is limited to certain second-level domains and all their sub-level domains.

      The following listing provides an example on how this scope type is set during the initial intel collection setup:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the second-level domain megacorpone.com to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage domain -w example -a megacorpone.com
      # add new host names to workspace example. The host names are automatically in scope due to the second-level
      # domain's scope all
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage hostname -w example -a www.megacorpone.com ftp.megacorpone.com
      # verify the initial setup
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kisreport domain -w example --csv | csvcut -c "Second-Level Domain (SLD)","Scope (SLD)","Host Name (HN)","In Scope (HN)" | csvlook
      | Second-Level Domain (SLD) | Scope (SLD) | Host Name (HN) | In Scope (HN) |
      | ------------------------- | ----------- | ------------------- | ------------- |
      | megacorpone.com | all | megacorpone.com | True |
      | megacorpone.com | all | www.megacorpone.com | True |
      | megacorpone.com | all | ftp.megacorpone.com | True |
    • strict: Sets the given second-level domains (e.g., megacorpone.com) in scope. In contrast to type all, any sub-level domains (e.g., www.megacorpone.com) are not automatically in scope, unless they are explicitly added. As a result, KIS automatically executes any active or active* collectors on such in-scope second-level domains and additionally on those sub-level domains that are explicitly added to the scope.

      This type is useful during penetration tests where the scope is limited to certain sub-level domains.

      The following listing provides an example on how this scope type is set during the initial intel collection setup:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the second-level domain megacorpone.com to workspace example and set the scope to strict
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage domain -w example -a megacorpone.com -s strict
      # add new host names to workspace example. They are automatically in scope due to kismanage's default value.
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage hostname -w example -a www.megacorpone.com ftp.megacorpone.com
      # verify the initial setup
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kisreport domain -w example --csv | csvcut -c "Second-Level Domain (SLD)","Scope (SLD)","Host Name (HN)","In Scope (HN)" | csvlook
      | Second-Level Domain (SLD) | Scope (SLD) | Host Name (HN) | In Scope (HN) |
      | ------------------------- | ----------- | ------------------- | ------------- |
      | megacorpone.com | strict | megacorpone.com | False |
      | megacorpone.com | strict | www.megacorpone.com | True |
      | megacorpone.com | strict | ftp.megacorpone.com | True |
      # Note that KIS treats the second-level domain also as a host name. As it has not been explicitly put in scope, it
      # is still out of scope.
    • exclude: Sets the given second-level domains (e.g., megacorpone.com) together with all sub-level domains out of scope. As a result, KIS does not execute any active and active* collectors on these second-level domains.

      This scope type is the default type for all second-level domains and their sub-level domains that are automatically identified by KIS (e.g., via extraction from certificates, etc.). Thus, it is not necessary to explicitly set this scope type. Nevertheless, this scope type can be used to manually exclude second-level domains at a later time.

  • Virtual hosts (vhost): KIS supports scanning vhosts (https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/vhosts/) by using tools like Nikto or Burp Suite Professional (see argument --vhost of script kiscollect. Which vhosts are in scope and which are not is indirectly specified by scoping IP networks and IP addresses (see above) together with Second-level domain and host names (see above). Below are two examples to demonstrate how it works:

    • Example 1: Let’s assume the second-level domain google.com together with all sub-level domains that resolve to a network range within 172.217.0.0/16 are in scope. In this case, the top-level domain google.com is added to the KIS database with scope type all as documented below:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the second-level domain google.com to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage domain -w example -a google.com

      In this case, KIS is able to, among other things, enumerate any sub-level domains as well as resolve their corresponding IP addresses. In addition, to ensure that KIS scans any host with an IP address within the IP network range 172.217.0.0/16, this network range must be added to KIS with scope type all as well:

      # add the network 172.217.0.0/16 to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage network -w example -a 172.217.0.0/16
    • Example 2: Let’s assume the second-level domain google.com together with all sub-level domains that resolve to any network range are in scope. In this case, the top-level domain google.com is added to the KIS database with scope type all as documented below:

      # create a new workspace example
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage workspace -a example
      # add the second-level domain google.com to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage domain -w example -a google.com

      In this case, KIS is able to, among other things, enumerate any sub-level domains as well as resolve their corresponding IP addresses. In addition, to ensure that KIS scans any host, the network range 0.0.0.0/0 must be added to KIS with scope type all as well:

      # add network 0.0.0.0/0 to workspace example and set the scope to all (default)
      $ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage network -w example -a 0.0.0.0/0

List of KIS Collectors

The following table shows the list of existing collectors that are supported by KIS. These collectors are executed by the script kiscollect to create and execute actual OS commands.

The Priority column provides information about the order of execution; the lower the number, the earlier the respective OS commands are created and executed and subsequent collectors can profit from the already collected information. Collectors with a priority of - are not automatically executed as they either require user interaction or additional information (e.g., domain credentials) for execution.

The Name column contains the name of the collector. These names can be added as commandline arguments to kiscollect (e.g. --httpnikto). The name also indicates, which underlying OS command is executed.

Column Level specifies whether the collector is operating on:

  • services: Scans services by using IPv4/IPv6 addresses and UDP/TCP port numbers
  • vhosts: Scans web services by using host names (instead of IP addresses) and TCP port numbers
  • hosts: Obtains information based on IPv4/IPv6 addresses
  • domains: Obtains information based on second-level domains and optionally sub-level domains
  • networks: Obtains information based on IPv4/IPv6 network ranges
  • emails: Obtains information based on emails
  • companies: Obtains information based on companies

Column Type specifies whether the collector actively approaches the target (active) or obtains the information from third-party sources (passive and active*).

The IP Support column specifies the IP versions, which are supported by the underlying Kali tool (e.g., gobuster). Kali uses this information to decide which operating systems commands can be created and successfully executed. This column is only relevant for host, network, service, and vhost collectors (see column Level).

Column Timeout specifies the number of seconds after which the collector is automatically terminated.

The column User specifies the user with which the respective operating system commands are executed.

Priority Name Level Type IP Support Timeout User
ftpdotdotpwn service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
httpdotdotpwn service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
tftpdotdotpwn service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
httphydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
rdphydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
smbhydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
smbmedusa service Active IPv4 nobody
smbmsflogin service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
sshhydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
125 builtwith domain Active* nobody
127 hostio domain Active* nobody
130 censysdomain domain Active* kali
131 securitytrails domain Active* nobody
132 dnsdumpster domain Active* nobody
133 certspotter domain Active* nobody
134 crtshdomain domain Active* nobody
135 virustotal domain Active* nobody
140 dnssublist3r domain Active nobody
141 dnsamasspassive domain Active* nobody
142 dnsamassactive domain Active nobody
143 dnscrobatdomain domain Active* nobody
144 dnscrobattld domain Active* nobody
150 theharvester domain Passive kali
155 awsslurp domain Active nobody
160 dnsenum domain Active nobody
170 dnsgobuster domain Active nobody
180 dnsrecon domain Active nobody
210 whoisdomain domain Active 30 nobody
215 dnsspf domain Active nobody
220 dnsdmarc domain Active nobody
235 dnsdkim domain Active nobody
240 dnstakeover domain Active nobody
310 dnshost domain Active nobody
312 dnshostpublic domain Passive nobody
320 dnsreverselookup host Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
360 dnscrobatreversehost host Active* IPv4, IPv6 nobody
410 hunter domain Active* nobody
420 haveibeenbreach email Active* nobody
430 haveibeenpaste email Active* nobody
510 whoishost host Passive IPv4, IPv6 30 nobody
512 whoisnetwork network Passive IPv4, IPv6 30 nobody
515 reversewhois company Active* nobody
520 shodanhost host Active* IPv4, IPv6 nobody
521 shodannetwork network Active* IPv4, IPv6 nobody
530 censyshost host Active* IPv4 kali
540 crtshcompany company Active* nobody
550 dnscrobatreversenetwork network Active* IPv4, IPv6 nobody
1100 tcpnmapnetwork network Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1150 tcpnmapdomain domain Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1200 udpnmapnetwork network Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1250 udpnmapdomain domain Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1270 icmpnmapnetwork network Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1300 tcpmasscannetwork network Active IPv4 root
1305 dnsaxfrdomain domain Active nobody
1306 dnsaxfrservice service Active* Ipv4, Ipv6 nobody
1320 vhostgobuster service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
1350 anyservicenmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
1820 tcptraceroute host Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
1900 httpmsfrobotstxt service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2000 dnsnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2020 telnetnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2040 vncnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2100 mssqlnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2150 mysqlnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2200 smbnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2250 ftpnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2300 smtpnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2400 rpcnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2500 rdpnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2700 pop3nmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2750 msrpcenum service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2800 imapnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2850 x11nmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2900 tftpnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
2950 nfsnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
3100 finger service Active IPv4 nobody
3200 ntpdate service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
3300 ntpq service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
4000 h323version service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
4100 sipnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
4120 sipmsf service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
4200 stunnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
11000 vncmsfnoneauth service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
11010 vncmsflogin service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
11100 ftphydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
11200 mssqlhydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
11400 pgsqlhydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
11500 snmphydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
11600 sshchangeme service Active IPv4, IPv6 kali
11610 httpchangeme service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 kali
11700 ipmi service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
11750 rmiregistrymsfgather service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
11760 rmiregistrynmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
12100 ftpfilelist service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
13000 showmount service Active IPv4, IPv6 300 nobody
13090 smbcme service Active IPv4, IPv6 kali
13100 smbclient service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
13200 smbfilelist service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
13210 smbmap service Active IPv4 nobody
21500 nbtscan service Active IPv4 nobody
21600 ldapsearch service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
21610 ldapnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
31100 snmpcheck service Active IPv4 300 nobody
31110 snmpnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
31200 onesixtyone service Active IPv4 60 nobody
31300 snmpwalk service Active IPv4 nobody
31400 oraclesidguess service Active IPv4 nobody
41100 sslyze service, vhost Active IPv4 nobody
41200 sshnmap service Active IPv4, IPv6 root
41300 certnmap service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 root
41310 tlsnmap service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 root
41320 sslscan service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
41330 certopenssl service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 120 nobody
51100 httpgobuster service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
51110 httpgobustersmart service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
51150 httpkiterunner service, vhost Active Ipv4 kali
51200 httpnmap service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 root
51205 httpntlmnmap service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 root
61400 rpcclient service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
61500 rpcinfo service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
71100 ikescan service Active IPv4 root
91050 httpwpscan service Active IPv4, IPv6 kali
91100 enum4linux service Active IPv4 nobody
91200 httpnikto service, vhost Active IPv4 nobody
91225 httpburpsuitepro domain, host Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
91250 httpdavtest service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
91260 httpwhatweb service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
91300 httpsqlmap service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
91400 smtpuserenum service Active IPv4 nobody
91600 mysqlhydra service Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
92200 httpwapiti service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 nobody
100000 vncviewer service Active IPv4 nobody
100100 httpeyewitness service, vhost Active IPv4, IPv6 3600 kali

Usage

After the setup, the following KIS commands are available.

kismanage

This script allows:

  • setting up and testing KIS
  • managing the database (re-creation, creating backups, restoring backups, etc.)
  • creating workspaces, networks, host names, emails, companies, etc.
  • importing Nmap, Nessus, and Masscan scan results
  • defining the scope

Run the following command to obtain more information and examples:

$ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kismanage -h

kiscollect

This script implements a commandline interface to collect the intelligence.

Run the following command to obtain more information and examples:

$ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kiscollect -h

kisreport

This script allows the analysis of the collected data via various filtering options. Supported report formats are:

  • Character-separated values (CSV): Export of the collected intelligence in the structured CSV format. This allows further processing via tools like grep, csvcut, or Aquatone
  • Microsoft Excel: Export of all collected intelligence into a Microsoft Excel file.
  • Text: Export of the collected raw text intelligence (e.g., text output of tool Nikto).
  • Raw: Export of additionally collected files like JSON objects from APIs like Shodan.io, or certificate files.

Run the following command to obtain more information and examples:

$ sudo docker-compose run kaliintelsuite kisreport -h

Author

Lukas Reiter (@chopicalquy) – Kali Intelligence Suite

License

This project is licensed under the GPLv3 License – see the license file for details.

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